Friday, January 29, 2010


Recent interview with Dallas, Texas native and hip-hop artists PLAYDOUGH.

DVC: So were did you get the name PLAYDOUGH come from? It's hysterical.
PLAYDOUGH: Playdough is a clever little way for me to hide my government name in a rap name. I won't say what it is but it's pretty easy to figure out.

DVC: What compelled you to start creating music and what have you learned about yourself in the process?
PLAYDOUGH: I've been drawn to music since i was a kid. It comes naturally and is such an enjoyable process to me. From the first idea to the execution along the way, then having a finished product that you're proud of. It can be whatever you want it to be, personal or very broad. I started rhyming when i was in 6th grade and haven't stopped writing since.

I've learned some people just have music (or any art) in them that can't be contained or kept inside. No training or upbringing in music is necessary to express what's inside of you. Kind of dope because that's what hip-hop is. Using what you've got to express what's in you.

DVC: So tell us about the last album you recorded.
PLAYDOUGH: "Don't Drink the Water" was the last full length solo record I did. About not buying into what people tell you to like, but deciding for yourself. I produced most of it but had a couple outside producers do production as well. It’s some pretty gritty sounding hip-hop, not very glossy or polished, some under the radar type of music. It’s taken me all over the world. Its official release was in 2006 so it's time for a new one.

DVC: Are you currently working on some new material? Do you have a working title?
PLAYDOUGH: I'm working on lots of new music. My crew Deepspace5 is dropping "The Future Ain't What It Used To Be" this year. I'm putting out a few mix-tapes as well, all leading up to my new full length "Hotdoggin".

DVC: What's the first single off that album "Hotdoggin"?
PLAYDOUGH: We haven't picked a single yet. I'm waiting to see what gets the most love with my publishing company and what some other industry nerds say. Some songs are being considered for placements in some TV shows, so that may force my hand to use what they pick for that.

DVC: How did Deepspace5 get together?
PLAYDOUGH: I hooked up with DS5 in 2001. We put out 2 major records since then and this new album will be our 3rd official release. Our latest free digital mix-tape is at

DVC: How would you describe the chemistry of Deepspace5 that you and the other members have?
PLAYDOUGH: I'm in a crew with some super smart dudes. The crew is comprised of attorneys, businessmen, I.T. guys, VP's and full time musicians. Some are good at really deep subject matter; some are the love bringers while others are really punch-line savvy or battle emcees. We all kind of fill a specific role amongst the crew. I think the more folks become familiar with our work the more they catch on to each member’s strengths.

DVC: Musically, who or what were your influences?
PLAYDOUGH: My dad hipped me to classic rock, so beyond a doubt that influenced me. But coming up I really dug DJ Muggs production so all the Cypress Hill, Funkdoobiest and House Of Pain stuff was big for me as well. Most influential to me growing up and still to this day would have to be De la Soul and Black Thought, very inspiring creatively and artistically. Still making exceptional music with each release. I can't say enough good things about them and what they've meant to my music live and in the studio.

DVC: Give me your favorite Roots and Cypress Hill album.
PLAYDOUGH: "Things Fall Apart" by The Roots. Though Black Thought has some monster verses on other songs from different albums. Cypress Hill's "Black Sunday" is the hardest overall album from them in my opinion. Plus I have really good memories listening to that record and skipping class.

DVC: So we found you through Twitter, how much have social media networks help you?
PLAYDOUGH: They've helped me tons. Promoting shows to booking shows and word of mouth from people. Being able to check you out right there with a link to your music is real helpful. The thing I want most right now is for people who have never heard of me to get a chance to listen to my music and it's a good way to do that. I have a hard time devoting enough time to all of the social networking sites but the time I do put in has been fruitful.

Check out for upcoming music by Playdough and download his latest beat tape, Who's Harry Krum? Up for grabs right now at for free, The Blueprint 3 Outtakes Deepspace5 Version. STAY DIRTY!

Thursday, January 14, 2010

Dennis Stock 1928-2010

Dennis Stock died Monday in Florida, he was 81. An outstanding photographer who became a associate member of Magnum, a photographic cooperative he joined in 1951. Stocked entered a Life magazine contest for young photographers and won first prizes for a series of refugees arriving in New York's harbor.

Stocks most lasting and notable pictures are of James Dean that were published for Life. Iconic portraits of Hollywood stars, blues and jazz musicians from 1957 - 1960.  Producing 15 books of photographic work and creating that captured moments of what Stock called, " an attitude of childlike discovery into adult existence."

Monday, January 11, 2010

Elvis at the Grammy Museum

From January to March 28 of this year a new exhibit has opened at the Grammy Museum at L.A. Live, "Elvis at 21: Photographs by Alfred Wertheimer." This traveling exhibit has it's first stop right here in Los Angeles. Featuring photos and rare performance footage of Elvis Presley.

Wertheimer studied photography in college and took a job as a photographer in the Army. As an aspiring freelance photographer he was told by a record company publicist to cover, at that time, the unknown Elvis Presley. For several months Wertheimer was capturing great moments of this young singer from Tupelo, Mississippi.
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